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Updated November 2018

Best Wind Chimes

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We analyze consumer reviews to find the best products on the web. We buy products with our own money and test them in our lab. We also interview experts and conduct independent research to pick the winners. We have affiliate partnerships so we may get a share of revenue from purchases. It’s how we fund our Research Lab and bring you better reviews and comparisons. Read more.

Best Wind Chimes Updated November 2018

Conclusion

Pros

Cons

Woodstock

Amazing Grace
Check Price at: 1 store
Tuned to the opening notes of Amazing Grace, this Woodstock wind chime looks and sounds beautiful.
The chime tubes have plastic eyelets to prevent tube strings from fraying. It also has a removable windcatcher.
The suspension cords and tube strings are attached with nailheads, making tube replacement difficult.

Woodstock

Pachelbel Canon
Check Price at: 1 store
One of the best wind chimes available, this set is tuned to the notes of Johann Pachelbel’s Canon and produces a fuller sound.
Made of ash wood, this wind chime comprises 2 sets of chimes for a beautiful, melodious sound.
The hanging ring is made of hard plastic instead of rust-proof metal. Some consumers have said the chimes are too loud.

UMA Enterprises

Capiz
Check Price at: 1 store
A coastal-inspired addition to any home, this affordable wind chime is desired for its beauty.
This multi-colored arrangement produces a soft sound when blown by a breeze.
Colors may fade in the sun. Its lightweight construction might not hold up in heavy winds or rain.

Brooklyn Basix

Freedom
Check Price at: 1 store
This bamboo wind chime is eco-friendly. It’s made of recyclable, renewable, and sustainable materials and produces relaxing tunes.
All wood components are constructed of renewable, laminated bamboo with 6 sandblasted, recycled aluminum tubes.
The string holding the chimes is rather thin and the sound is faint.

Woodstock

Mars Wind
Check Price at: 1 store
Rich, bronze-colored tubes produce uplifting harmonies tuned to a 5-note pentatonic scale.
This Woodstock wind chime has exceptional sound quality for its affordable price.
The hanging diamond is printed and looks like a tag.

OUR PROCESS

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Customer Reviews
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Our House Method Reviews team brought in multiple wind chimes and tested wind resistance and sound levels to ensure the products were both durable and melodious. In addition to our tests, we consulted thousands of wind chime reviews and scoured the Internet for what people value the most in a wind chime. Our findings and recommendations should provide you with the right knowledge to make an informed decision when purchasing your wind chime.

Wind Chime Reviews Guide

People have been enjoying wind chimes for years, delighting in the beautiful sounds produced by these sets. But which ones produce the best sound? Which ones are able to withstand harsh winds and rain? Which ones can be hung indoors? The best wind chimes will look beautiful, produce charming sounds, and withstand the elements. In this comprehensive guide, we provide you with an in-depth breakdown of wind chimes, important factors that should be considered before purchase, and some commonly asked questions.

Parts of a wind chime

  • Loop—There is a metal or knotted string loop that can be found at the top of your wind chime set. This is for hanging the chimes.
  • Suspension cords—These cords are typically made of synthetic cord or thick string and connect the loop to the suspension platform.
  • Suspension platform—This usually round platform can be made of plastic, wood, ceramic, or metal, and holds the tubes.
  • Tubes—Hung by the suspension platform, the tubes can be made of metal, bamboo, glass, or ceramic. The length and number of tubes determine what sounds are produced.
  • Clapper—Also known as a striker, this piece comes into contact with the tubes and creates the sounds.
  • Sail—The sail dangles from the clapper and hangs below the tubes. The size of the sail determines how much wind is needed to cause the chime to sound.

Hang the wind chimes directly from their hanging ring—adding an extra cord to hold the set can alter the tone and allow the whole structure to sway.”

5 Major factors to consider

Design

There are two popular types of wind chime designs: tubular and bell.

  • Tubular—This is the most popular design. Available in a variety of styles and sizes, tubular wind chimes are made of several vertically hanging tubes with each tube producing a unique sound.
  • Bell—These are made of one or more bells and are available in traditional or contemporary styles. Most bell wind chimes are made of brass.
Tube materials

The tube finish primarily affects the overall visual appeal of a wind chime. Popular materials include metal, bamboo, ceramic, and glass.

  • Metal—Metal wind chimes are the most popular because of how well they withstand the elements and because they can be tuned to specific notes. Metal is the only material that can be tuned. Aluminum is by far the most popular material due to the clarity, volume, and duration of its chimes. Steel, brass, and copper are other viable options.
  • Bamboo—Bamboo wind chimes aren’t as durable as metal (they’re extremely lightweight), but they still provide beautiful sounds that are hollow and deep.
  • Ceramic and glass—These are chosen for their decorative style and color rather than for the sounds they produce. Most will produce a light, quiet tinkle that won’t overwhelm normal conversation. If you want to hang a wind chime indoors, we recommend going for a ceramic or glass option.
Sounds

Do you want your wind chime to produce lighter tones or louder, more hollow sounds? The size and number of tubes will determine what sound the wind chimes produce.

  • High tones—For higher-pitched sounds, look for wind chimes that are less than a foot long or for ones made of ceramic or glass.
  • Medium tones—Wind chimes that are two to three feet long have more tubes than longer wind chimes and can produce a wider variety of tones.
  • Low tones—If you want louder, more robust tones, look for wind chimes that are at least four feet or more in length. These chimes produce tenor and bass tones.
Number of tubes

The number of tubes a wind chime has determines the number of notes it can play. Wind chimes with multiple tubes can combine more sounds and create different harmonies while wind chimes with fewer tubes produce only a couple of sounds.

Length of the wind chime

Most chimes are measured in inches from the top of the ring hook to the bottom of the sail. The overall length will determine the tone and depth of each sound. Longer wind chimes produce fuller tones while shorter ones produce high-pitched tones.

How much do wind chimes cost?

The cost of wind chimes varies depending on material and quality. Some cost less than $10 and are designed solely for appearance while others may cost upward of $50 or more. Out of all the products we recommend, the UMA Enterprises Capiz Wind Chime is the most affordable, costing less than $15, while the Woodstock Pachelbel Canon is the most expensive costing around $35.

To extend the life of your wind chimes, hang them in an area protected from direct sunlight and heavy winds.”

Frequently asked questions

What are wind chimes made of?

Some of the best wind chimes are made of metal, bamboo, ceramic, and glass. They can also be made with suspended shells, clay shapes, or other tinkling objects.

How do I maintain my wind chimes?

For aluminum wind chimes, use mild soap and water to clean the tubes every now and then. If you have a wooden wind chime, regular oiling will help protect the wood. Periodically apply a thin layer of lemon oil with a clean cloth. For glass, ceramic, or resin wind chimes, use a damp cloth to clean the tubes.

Can I hang a wind chime indoors?

Yes. Indoor wind chimes won’t get much wind, but they still might produce some sound if hung by a window or door. We recommend ceramic or glass wind chimes for indoor use.

Does the amount of wind chime tubes matter?

Yes. The more tubes a wind chime has, the more tones the set can produce.

The team that worked on this review

Kealia Reynolds
Writer
Rebekah Sedaca
Photo Editor
Kelsey Roadruck
Editor
John Morgan
Producer

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