The Cities With the Newest & Oldest Homes

One of the most important factors you need to consider when buying a home is its age. The age of a house impacts everything from its condition to its architectural style, yard size, and even your homeowners insurance. Unfortunately, in many cities, finding a home that’s the right age can be difficult or extremely expensive. To aid in your home search, we conducted a study on 150 cities to determine which have the oldest and newest homes. This article reviews the study’s results and discusses its findings.

Main Findings

  • The cities with the most new houses are:
    • Austin, TX (11.4%)
    • Provo, UT (10.8%)
    • Myrtle Beach, SC (10.0%)
    • Boise, ID (8.9%)
    • Raleigh, NC (8.7%)
  • The cities that house the oldest homes are:
    • Scranton, PA (33.4%)
    • Boston, MA (32.1%)
    • Providence, RI (29.6%)
    • Springfield, MA (29.1%)
    • Buffalo, NY (28.4%)
  • Most cities with newer homes are located in Southern or Western states, with Texas holding five of the top 15 spots.
  • Most cities with the oldest homes are in the Northeastern U.S., with New York holding five of the top 15 spots and Pennsylvania right behind with four.

Average Age of Homes in the U.S.

For this study, we gathered data from the U.S. Census Bureau on the year-built date of the homes for the top 150 most populated cities. We then used the percentage of homes built before 1940 as our metric for older homes and those built in 2014 or sooner for newer homes. In total, across all the cities we analyzed, the median build date for houses was 1974, meaning the average house on the market for most cities is just under 50 years old. Below, we’ll look at which cities have the oldest homes and which have the newest, and then present our full dataset.

Cities With the Most and Least Newest Homes

After analyzing the data, we found that the top five cities with the highest percentage of new homes are: Austin, TX, at 11.4% (over 90,000 homes), Provo, UT, at 10.8% (over 18,000 homes), Myrtle Beach, SC, at 10.0% (over 19,000 homes), Boise, ID, at 8.9% (just over 24,000 homes), and Raleigh, NC, at 8.7% (over 34,000 homes). We noticed some similarities between these cities: they’re all situated within the Sun Belt and experiencing some degree of economic boom. Utah, for example, has gained the nickname “Mini Silicon Valley” for its rapidly growing tech sector.

Following Raleigh, we have Charleston, SC, at 8.4%, Nashville, TN, at 8.3%, Houston, TX, at 8.1%, San Antonio, TX, at 7.5%, and Des Moines, IA, at 7.3%. As we can see, most of the cities with the newest homes still sit within the Sun Belt.

The final five spots are occupied by Fort Collins, CO, at 7.3%, Dallas, TX, at 7.1%, Naples, FL, at 7.1%, Fayetteville, AR, at 7.0%, and Killeen, TX, at 7.00%. We can see that Texas holds three cities within the top 10 and a total of five out of 15 cities with the newest homes. Considering the massive number of businesses moving into Texas and its favorable property tax laws, it should be no surprise that many new homes have been constructed there.

For the cities with the least number of new homes, we have:

  1. Rockford, IL, at 0.5%
  2. Youngstown, OH, at 0.8%
  3. Scranton, PA, at 1.0%
  4. Providence, RI, at 1.1%
  5. New Haven, CT, at 1.1%
  6. Modesto, CA, at 1.2%
  7. Flint, MI, at 1.2%
  8. Dayton, OH, at 1.2%
  9. Springfield, MA, at 1.3%
  10. Hartford, CT, at 1.4%
  11. Peoria, IL, at 1.4%
  12. Reading, PA, at 1.4%
  13. Hickory, NC, at 1.5%
  14. Canton, OH, at 1.5%
  15. Cleveland, OH, at 1.5%

This list has the highest diversity within the entire study. While many states still exist within the Rust Belt, the only state with a majority of locations is Ohio, with four spots. There are even several cities that, regionally speaking, stand out, specifically Modesto and Hickory. Both sit within states experiencing economic prosperity, making their position on this list surprising.

Cities With the Most And Least Older Homes

On the other end of the spectrum, we have cities with the highest number of older homes. Occupying the top five spots are Scranton, PA, at 33.4% (over 76,000 homes), Boston, MA, at 32.1 (over 595,000 homes), Providence, RI, at 29.6% (over 188,000 homes), Springfield, MA, at 29.1% (nearly 79,000 homes), and Buffalo, NY, at 28.4% (over 137,000). Unsurprisingly, the top five spots on this list are dominated by Legacy Cities. A Legacy City is a location that experienced a population boom in the first half of the 20th century, only to see a population decline as local industry lessened. These cities typically have some of the oldest homes in America, with plenty of them and less incentive to create new ones.

After Buffalo comes New York City at 27.9%, Worcester, MA, at 27.6%, Rochester, NY, at 26.5%, Reading, PA, at 25.8%, and Albany, NY, at 25.4%. As we get into the top 10, we can see some clear patterns developing. First, most of the states on this list are located in the Rust Belt, the only exception being Providence. Second, New York state occupies most of this list, with four out of 10 positions. New York’s prominence on this list is not surprising, as it is one of the oldest states in the U.S.

Rounding out our top 15 cities with the highest number of older homes are Pittsburg, PA, at 24.9%, Allentown, PA, at 24.5%, Syracuse, NY, at 24.1%, Davenport, IA, at 23.3%, and New Haven, CT, at 22.9%. The results show that the majority are located in the U.S.’s Northeastern region. New York still holds the most spots at five, with Pennsylvania right behind at four.

The cities with the least number of old homes are:

  1. Las Vegas, NV, at 0.4%
  2. Naples, FL, at 0.4%
  3. Anchorage, AK, at 0.5%
  4. Cape Coral, FL, at 0.6
  5. Palm Bay, FL, at 0.9%
  6. Phoenix, AZ, at 0.9%
  7. McAllen, TX, at 1.0%
  8. Myrtle Beach, SC, at 1.1%
  9. Ocala. FL, at 1.2%
  10. Port St. Lucie, FL, at 1.2%
  11. Orlando, FL, at 1.5%
  12. North Port, FL, at 1.6%
  13. Tallahassee, FL, at 1.8%
  14. Deltona, FL, at 1.8%
  15. Tucson, AZ, at 1.9%

Analyzing this data, we can see several patterns emerge. First, Florida holds the lion’s share of positions, accounting for eight of the 15 cities with the least number of old homes. Second, each city either belongs to the Southern coast or lies within the Sun Belt, except for Anchorage, Alaska, the only notable outlier.

Full Data

This table shows the results of our study. You can sort by city, state, percentage of oldest homes, and percentage of newest homes.

Cities

States

Oldest Homes %

Newest Homes %

Austin

TX

2.2%

11.4%

Provo

UT

4.2%

10.8%

Myrtle Beach

SC

1.1%

10.0%

Boise City

ID

4.7%

8.9%

Raleigh

NC

2.5%

8.7%

Charleston

SC

3.3%

8.4%

Nashville

TN

4.4%

8.3%

Houston

TX

2.3%

8.1%

San Antonio

TX

4.2%

7.5%

Des Moines

IA

14.8%

7.3%

Fort Collins

CO

5.1%

7.3%

Dallas

TX

2.6%

7.1%

Naples

FL

0.4%

7.1%

Fayetteville

AR

3.1%

7.0%

Killeen

TX

2.3%

7.0%

Charlotte

NC

3.9%

6.9%

Durham

NC

4.9%

6.9%

Salisbury

MD

7.3%

6.9%

Orlando

FL

1.5%

6.7%

Savannah

GA

6.9%

6.6%

North Port

FL

1.6%

6.4%

Jacksonville

FL

3.6%

6.3%

Salt Lake City

UT

7.4%

6.3%

McAllen

TX

1.0%

6.3%

Greenville

SC

4.0%

5.9%

Baton Rouge

LA

3.6%

5.9%

El Paso

TX

4.2%

5.9%

Huntsville

AL

2.1%

5.7%

Denver

CO

6.3%

5.6%

Lincoln

NE

13.8%

5.5%

Seattle

WA

9.8%

5.4%

Oklahoma City

OK

5.8%

5.4%

Lakeland

FL

3.2%

5.4%

Columbia

SC

3.3%

5.3%

Augusta

GA

4.4%

5.2%

Ogden

UT

6.4%

5.2%

Cape Coral

FL

0.6%

5.1%

Little Rock

AR

3.5%

5.1%

Lafayette

LA

4.6%

5.1%

Corpus Christi

TX

3.0%

5.1%

Las Vegas

NV

0.4%

5.0%

Madison

WI

13.6%

5.0%

Reno

NV

2.4%

5.0%

Atlanta

GA

2.7%

4.9%

Colorado Springs

CO

4.9%

4.8%

Pensacola

FL

2.6%

4.8%

Phoenix

AZ

0.9%

4.7%

Portland

OR

11.8%

4.7%

Tulsa

OK

6.2%

4.5%

Indianapolis

IN

11.5%

4.4%

Tampa

FL

2.5%

4.3%

Omaha

NE

16.1%

4.2%

Asheville

NC

8.6%

4.2%

Beaumont

TX

3.6%

4.2%

Washington

DC

8.0%

4.1%

Spokane

WA

13.5%

4.1%

Richmond

VA

8.4%

4.0%

Knoxville

TN

6.1%

3.9%

Lexington

KY

7.0%

3.9%

Fayetteville

NC

2.3%

3.9%

Port St. Lucie

FL

1.2%

3.9%

Chattanooga

TN

6.9%

3.8%

Columbus

OH

11.5%

3.7%

Virginia Beach

VA

5.4%

3.7%

San Jose

CA

4.9%

3.7%

Montgomery

AL

4.2%

3.7%

Minneapolis

MN

13.6%

3.6%

Greensboro

NC

5.4%

3.6%

Visalia

CA

5.4%

3.6%

Springfield

MO

8.1%

3.5%

Shreveport

LA

4.2%

3.5%

Kansas City

MO

11.0%

3.4%

Grand Rapids

MI

14.8%

3.4%

Jackson

MS

3.0%

3.4%

Birmingham

AL

6.5%

3.3%

Winston-Salem

NC

5.8%

3.3%

Louisville County

KY

11.7%

3.2%

Bakersfield

CA

4.1%

3.2%

Palm Bay

FL

0.9%

3.2%

Salem

OR

7.7%

3.2%

Fresno

CA

5.5%

3.1%

Wichita

KS

10.3%

3.1%

Stockton

CA

6.7%

3.1%

Gulfport

MS

2.9%

3.1%

Baltimore

MD

13.6%

3.0%

Deltona

FL

1.8%

3.0%

Lancaster

PA

20.0%

3.0%

Eugene

OR

6.9%

3.0%

Miami

FL

2.1%

2.9%

Memphis

TN

4.7%

2.9%

Tucson

AZ

1.9%

2.9%

Albany

NY

25.4%

2.9%

Urban Honolulu

HI

3.2%

2.9%

Portland

ME

22.5%

2.9%

Riverside

CA

2.8%

2.8%

Ocala

FL

1.2%

2.8%

Boston

MA

32.1%

2.7%

Tallahassee

FL

1.8%

2.7%

Albuquerque

NM

3.0%

2.6%

Vallejo

CA

5.1%

2.6%

St. Louis

MO

15.1%

2.5%

Cincinnati

OH

16.2%

2.5%

Sacramento

CA

4.2%

2.5%

San Diego

CA

4.2%

2.4%

Bridgeport

CT

19.5%

2.4%

Harrisburg

PA

18.0%

2.4%

Fort Wayne

IN

13.5%

2.4%

Ann Arbor

MI

11.4%

2.4%

Anchorage

AK

0.5%

2.4%

New Orleans

LA

11.5%

2.3%

Mobile

AL

4.1%

2.2%

Lansing

MI

16.2%

2.1%

York

PA

18.1%

2.1%

Manchester

NH

18.3%

2.1%

Philadelphia

PA

20.8%

2.0%

San Francisco

CA

19.1%

2.0%

Huntington

WV

10.7%

2.0%

Pittsburgh

PA

24.9%

1.9%

Milwaukee

WI

21.4%

1.9%

Allentown

PA

24.5%

1.9%

Santa Maria

CA

7.7%

1.9%

Los Angeles

CA

11.6%

1.8%

Toledo

OH

22.4%

1.8%

Poughkeepsie

NY

19.5%

1.8%

New York

NY

27.9%

1.7%

Detroit

MI

11.3%

1.7%

Rochester

NY

26.5%

1.7%

Santa Rosa

CA

7.8%

1.7%

Davenport

IA

23.3%

1.7%

Chicago

IL

19.6%

1.6%

Buffalo

NY

28.4%

1.6%

Worcester

MA

27.6%

1.6%

Akron

OH

17.7%

1.6%

Oxnard

CA

3.4%

1.6%

Cleveland

OH

21.6%

1.5%

Syracuse

NY

24.1%

1.5%

Canton

OH

20.0%

1.5%

Hickory

NC

5.3%

1.5%

Hartford

CT

18.1%

1.4%

Peoria

IL

19.8%

1.4%

Reading

PA

25.8%

1.4%

Springfield

MA

29.1%

1.3%

Dayton

OH

14.9%

1.2%

Modesto

CA

5.9%

1.2%

Flint

MI

10.8%

1.2%

Providence

RI

29.6%

1.1%

New Haven

CT

22.9%

1.1%

Scranton

PA

33.4%

1.0%

Youngstown

OH

19.1%

0.8%

Rockford

IL

14.3%

0.5%

Final Thoughts

Cities with booming economies, typically in the Southern or Western regions, are experiencing tremendous growth. This expansion has resulted in more homes being built, making these cities climb to the top of the list for newer homes. Conversely, cities that have already experienced tremendous growth in the past, like those in the Rust Belt, already have plenty of housing from their previous economic boom. If you’re looking for newly constructed homes, try searching in cities along the Sun Belt. But, if you prefer an older, cheaper home, the Rust Belt has plenty available.

One interesting observation is that Texas and New York have several parallels. Both occupy five top 15 positions for the number of newest and oldest homes, respectively. Furthermore, both states hold the top spots for the highest total number of new homes (Texas) and old homes (New York).

FAQs

What is The Average American Home Age by State?

The average age of a typical American home is about 35 years old.

What Costs More, an Older Home or a Newer Home?

Multiple factors can affect the cost of a home, such as location and size. But, new homes are typically more expensive than older homes.

Is There an Advantage to a Newer Home Over an Older Home?

There are advantages to both newer and older homes. Newer homes are usually in better condition than older homes and have more up-to-date systems and construction. Older homes typically have a unique appearance, historic value, are cheaper, and come with larger lot sizes.

Methodology

To find the cities with the oldest and newest homes, we analyzed data from the U.S. Census Bureau. For this study, we defined “old homes” as any house built before 1940, and anything built in 2014 or later as “new homes”. We researched over 900 cities within the United States and analyzed the top 150 (based on total homes) for our study.

Other Resources

Moving

The Most and Least Humid Cities in the U.S.

There are plenty of reasons to undertake a move — better work, being closer to friends and family, and of course, greater comfort. Let us help you find the most comfortable city for you with this study on the most and least humid cities in the U.S.

Solar

Most and Least Friendly States for Solar Energy (2022 Report)

Keeping track of which states support solar energy can be difficult. To clear things up, we conducted a study on the most solar-friendly states.

Blog

Property Taxes by County: Where do People Pay the Most and Least? [Data Study]

An unavoidable truth in life is taxes. If you're a homeowner, you're no exception. But, what you pay can vary significantly depending on where you live. So, the question is: where do people pay the highest property taxes and where do people pay the least?

Moving

How To Find a Job in a New City Before Moving

Are you struggling to find a job in a new city before moving? Learn how to find one easier and faster with our guide.

Moving

Are There Government Programs To Help Make Moving More Affordable?

The cost of moving can be overwhelming for some families. Thankfully, there are government programs that can take the weight off.

Moving

8 Charities That Help With Moving Expenses

The cost of moving and relocating can be overwhelming. However, some groups can lessen the burden. Here are eight charities to help with moving expenses.

Moving

Best Interstate Moving Companies (2022 Review)

Are you moving across state lines? Check out our review of the best interstate moving companies to prepare for your big move.

Moving

Best Cross-Country Moving Companies (2022 Review)

Trying to move cross-country? We review the best cross-country moving companies so you can find the right mover for you.

Moving

Best Long-Distance Moving Companies (2022 Review)

Are you moving long-distance and don’t know where to start? Check out our guide on the best long-distance movers to prepare for your move.