Tour a South Street Seaport Loft
Full of Texture and Color

By: Matilda Davies Urban living
Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

The brick walk-up at 115 South Street in lower Manhattan, with its clean facade and stone base was once a ship chandlery belonging to whaling outfitters Slate, Gardiner & Howell. The neighborhood, known as South Street Seaport, got its start in 1625 when the Dutch West India Company built an outpost near this spot, making it a key port for Dutch trade. By the time the building at 115 South Street was erected in the mid-19th century, the area was home to bars and brothels supported by the maritime clientele that poured out of the trading ships docked at the neighboring pier.

More than 150 years later, one-fifteen was plucked from the dreck that was post-9/11 South Street Seaport: most windows in the area were dark, few New Yorkers inhabited or even conducted business these forgotten maritime ziggurats—some even slated for demolition, there was a certain quiet on these lower streets.

Former architect and vinter-cum-author Marco Pansanella bought the building at 115 South Street in 2002 with his wife, the interior designer Rebecca Robertson, because they saw what it would one day become.

In the fifteen years since Marco and Rebecca bought the building, the neighborhood has caught up to what they envisioned more than a decade ago. Now filled with world-class restaurants, shopping, and nightlife, it’s as if Marco and Rebecca stood atop the five-story walk-up, looked out at its views of the harbor and the East River and called out the future.

We stepped inside this expansive loft, currently listed as a rental property by Corcoran Group, to get a glimpse of what it has become

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Floors The owners bleached the hardwoods and painted the exposed brick white to create a sense of lightness in the space

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Shelving The expansive built-ins help delineate the open loft into office, living room, dining, and kitchen

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Kitchen Owner Marco Pansanella designed and built the industrial kitchen island with materials salvaged from the neighborhood

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Making space Because the loft is one large open space, owner and interior designer Rebecca Robertson has created smaller nooks for living and dining

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

History The metal contraption is called a wench, and is part of a pulley system that was used under the building's original function as a ship chandlery

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Fireplace The fireplace features Dutch tiles in a blue and white nautical theme

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Drapes The ceiling-to-floor drapes feature a New Amsterdam toile pattern, a nod to the building's Dutch shipping origin

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Office The home's office is nestled in the corner of the open loft

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Sitting Who wouldn't love the contrast of the crimson settee against the cool blue and white wallpaper

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Master bedroom A vintage wool blanket hangs above the bed whose posts were inspired by the towers of the San Gimignano

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Office A second office sits in the master bedroom against white beadboard walls

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Bedroom A second bedroom continues the blue and white nod to the home's nautical past

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Bathroom A beautiful porcelain tub sits in the beadboard-paneled bathroom

Photo by Ashley Gallerani for House Method

Bathroom Industrial meets maritime in this beautifully restored bathroom

Launch Slideshow

See More House Tours

House Tours

Tour a Modern Jewel at 15 Union Square West

Tour a condo in Manhattan's storied 15 Union Square West. The former home of Tiffany and Co's headquarters now houses 36 luxury condominiums. We explore the building's history and open this satiny masterpiece to glimpse a three-bedroom jewel of a home.

House Tours

At Home with Chelsea Lankford

An interview with Chelsea Lankford of Truelane. We caught up with Chelsea at her Seattle home to talk about the move back to her Pacific Northwest hometown and what home means when you’re on the road for a living.

House Tours

Step Inside a Colorful and Classic Home on Central Park West

Step inside a beautiful two-bedroom penthouse atop 230 Central Park West, with expansive views of the park and of the glittering Midtown skyline.

House Tours

Tour a Little Seattle Bungalow Just Blocks from Puget Sound

Tour a little bungalow in West Seattle and hear how the homeowners have made this little home their own, from room expansions to new siding and a little TLC in the details.

House Tours

Tour a South Street Seaport Loft Full of Texture and Color

Step inside an expansive loft in lower Manhattan home to an interior designer and a former architect. From original industrial details to nautical nods to the build's past, this space is the perfect combination of New Amsterdam and New York.

House Tours

Best Homes with a View

Warmer weather has us dreaming of time spent outside, sun-filled patios, and waterfront properties. Here are our favorite homes with the most breathtaking views.

House Tours

Step Inside a Perfect Mid-Century Gem Made for Gatherings

Tour a marvelously restored mid-century modern home made to transport you back to the era of Auntie Mame and post-war suburbia

House Tours

Tour SoHo’s Most
Eligible Penthouse

See a $14.8 million penthouse atop 52 Wooster Street. This home is perfectly styled in bright contemporary pieces, infused with mid-century influence, and decked with luxurious marble accents. Get a glimpse of this spectacular home and its sweeping lower Manhattan views.

House Tours

Tour a House That’s All
About the Details

Tour a house built and designed from scratch in just nine months. See how the homeowners improved the flow of their home and made it look more historic by focusing on small, important details.


What Did You Think?

Join the Conversation

By continuing to browse or by clicking “OK” you agree to the storing of first- and third-party cookies on your device to enhance site navigation, analyze site usage, and assist in our marketing efforts. Privacy Policy.

OK